Services/Pricing

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How are my tires?

Frequently Asked Questions

We try to anticipate questions you might have about our PRODUCT / SERVICE and provide
the answers here. If you need additional information send email to allmototire@comcast.net.

1.

How do I know if I need new tires?

From a wear perspective, one simple way to tell is to let old Abe Lincoln help! If when you insert a penny into the shallowest part of the remaining tread and the depth is less than the top of Lincoln's head, your tire is generally at the legal wear limit.

There are other factors in determining whether your tires should be replaced. For example, if you can see visible damage such as a puncture or tear, do not ride your motorcycle. Have the tire examined by a professional and/or replaced. As tires age, they tend to "dry out" and rubber can crack or "weather check." Look for signs of cracking on the sidewalls for example.

If you ride your motorcycle in warmer weather, ride two-up, or carry heavy loads, your tires may tend to wear faster. You might need to check them more often. Road conditions can affect tire wear as well. Riders having more aggressive cornering, braking, and accelerating habits will undoubtedly notice more wear.

One of the most overlooked and under appreciated aspect of tire maintenance is tire pressure! Be
sure to check air pressure frequently and do so when the tire is "cold" (before riding). As a tire heats up, pressure tends to increase - which is the reason for checking the "cold" pressure. Sometimes uneven wear can be caused by incorrect pressure. Consult your owner's manual for the correct tire pressures, and be sure to adjust tire pressure based on whether you ride alone or with a passenger.

Generally, more tire pressure is required as loads increase. Be sure not to overinflate as well! From a wear perspective, one simple way to tell is to let old Abe Lincoln help! If when you insert a penny into the shallowest part of the remaining tread and the depth is less than the top of Lincoln's head, your tire is generally at the legal wear limit.

There are other factors in determining whether your tires should be replaced. For example, if you can see visible damage such as a puncture or tear, do not ride your motorcycle. Have the tire examined by a professional and/or replaced. As tires age, they tend to "dry out" and rubber can crack or "weather check." Look for signs of cracking on the sidewalls for example.

If you ride your motorcycle in warmer weather, ride two-up, or carry heavy loads, your tires may tend to wear faster. You might need to check them more often. Road conditions can affect tire wear as well. Riders having more aggressive cornering, braking, and accelerating habits will undoubtedly notice more wear.

One of the most overlooked and under appreciated aspect of tire maintenance is tire pressure! Be sure to check air pressure frequently and do so when the tire is "cold" (before riding). As a tire heats up, pressure tends to increase - which is the reason for checking the "cold" pressure. Sometimes uneven wear can be caused by incorrect pressure. Consult your owner's manual for the correct tire pressures, and be sure to adjust tire pressure based on whether you ride alone or with a passenger. Generally, more tire pressure is required as loads increase. Be sure not to overinflate as well!

Look at these images. First here's a new tire. Note that the tread depth covers Abe's head:

New Tire 

Now let's look at a tire worn beyond the legal limit:

Worn Tire 

Here's an image of a tire that was said to have been ridden "only 200 miles from home"... "It had
tread on it when I left!" The owner of this motorcycle took a great risk in riding on a worn tire. The
difference between a safe ride and disaster can be only a fraction of a millimeter away! Keep in mind that the tread on your motorcycle tire not only keeps you and your wheels rolling along, but also provides for heat dissipation. As the tire wears more heat can be retained in the carcass of the tire.

By the time the tread reaches the wear bars, there isn't much left between the air on the inside of
the tire and the surrounding atmosphere! Luckily, this rider lived to tell the story.

Over Worn Tire 

So, check those tires and check them often.

All Moto Tire, LLC